What is Leaky Gut? And 12 signs you have one…

The digestive system is an 8.5-meter long tube from the mouth to anus. It has two closely related purposes. Firstly, it breaks down food into smaller particles so that nourishing, life-sustaining nutrients can enter the bloodstream and can be used by the body. Secondly, it blocks toxins, pathogens, and undigested foodstuffs from being absorbed into the body. Leaky gut, or increased intestinal permeability as it’s known academically, allows the uncontrolled passage of undigested food particles, toxins, and pathogens into the body from the small intestine.

In the small intestine, the epithelial lining itself is only one cell thick. It functions like a cheesecloth with only small molecules intended to pass through the intestinal barrier. As food winds its way through the small intestine, it is broken down into smaller and smaller components until they are small enough to be absorbed through the cheesecloth.

Holes in a net

However, when there is inflammation in the intestine and increased intestinal permeability, larger macro-molecules, pass through the cheesecloth unchecked. It is as if the cheesecloth has tears in it which let the larger molecules through. This is bad news as the immune system recognises these molecules as undesirables and produces anti-bodies to these molecules, leading to inflammation, and the potential for a host of health issues.

The state of health or the state of disease is the combination between what we are – meaning what genetically makes us the way we’re engineered – and the environment that’s around us. And the gut is the point of entry in which these two elements meet

Alessio Fasano, MD

Epithelial lining and mucus work together

The good news, the epithelial lining is protected by a layer of mucus, known as the mucosal immune system (MALT). While the epithelial lining restricts access to the body of ‘troublesome’ macro-molecules and secretes antimicrobial substances, the mucus prevents unwanted organisms from adhering to the lining – this is where the good commensal bacteria live, limiting the colonisation of unwanted organisms.

In healthy states, the MALT provides protection against pathogens but maintains tolerance against non-threating substances. In the gut, the secretion of IgA provides an immune response to potential antigens in food without a large and unnecessary systemic immune response.

Luckily, there are dietary and lifestyle changes, aswell as nutrients that can be taken to help repair this protective firewall.

It is now recognized that the
interface of the individual’s intestinal immune system with their gut microbiome has a critical effect on metabolism and immunity spanning the function of many organs and diseases including cancer, diabetes, arthritis, obesity, anxiety/depression, and autism.

Dr J.Bland (Founder and PIONEER IN FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE)

How can I tell if I have leaky gut?

While there is testing that can be done for intestinal permeability, the truth is MOST people with a chronic health issue will have some degree of increased intestinal permeability.

And remember, you don’t have to have gut symptoms to have a leaky gut. Leaky gut can manifest as autoimmune conditions affecting the thyroid (Hashimoto’s) or joints (rheumatoid arthritis), mental illness, depression, skin problems like eczema or psoriasis and more.

12 signs you have leaky gut:

  1. Food sensitivities or intolerances – As food particles may enter the bloodstream through a leaky gut, the immune system of a person with increased intestinal permeability may react to a food (especially gluten and dairy). Leaky gut and allergies have been found to be linked.
  2. Poor Immune System Function: Including susceptibility to viruses and parasites
  3. IBS and bloating Particularly diarrhea-predominant IBS
  4. Candida, Parasites and Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth
  5. Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  6. Chronic Fatigue – Inflammatory compounds, called cytokines are associated with increased intestinal permeability and can lead to fatigue
  7. Auto-Immune Diseasesread more here including Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis
  8. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome – PCOS has been associated with increased zonulin, a biomarker of increased intestinal permeability
  9. Nutrient Malabsorption – This may be associated with fatigue
  10. Skin issues – such as psoriasis, acne, rosacea, or eczema
  11. Mood issues, Depression, Anxiety, and Mood Swings
  12. Brain Fog and Memory Issues

Now, the good news is intestinal permeability is completely reversible, and the mucosal firewall can be repaired. This may then improve health conditions outside of the gut so that you feel the difference.

But first, read the next article to find out how intestinal permeability is key to the development of an auto-immune disease…


If you are ready to get your health and vitality back so you can lead a better life but need a little bit of help, I offer one-to-one consultation plans. I will help you get to the root cause of your gut issues, and address it with an effective personalised nutrition and lifestyle plan, that is manageable and sustainable, without nasty side effects.

Call 041672091 or email info@fairfieldnutrition.com.au NOW!

Quit sugar: The effect of sugar on our guts

When we are stressed or tired, we automatically seek out something sweet to fill an urge. And many of us find it difficult to stop eating sweet foods such as chocolate once we have started.

It is as if, we are biologically hard-wired to crave sugar. In Paleolithic times, that sweetness was probably hard to find and the calories were valuable, and so our bodies today do not know how plentiful sugar is in today’s society and we still have that craving. It’s not your fault that you crave sugar, and it’s perfectly normal.

Sugar in Australia

Australia’s sugar intake has been described by experts as ‘alarming’ with the worst habits among children and adolescents. The 2011 Australian Health Survey of more than 8000 participants found 55% of people consumed more added sugars than recommended. The average American is eating somewhere between 130 and 152 pounds, or 58 to 69kg of sugar a year! 152 pounds of sugar equates to 52 teaspoons a day. If we could see this amount of sugar laid out, I’m convinced we would immediately do something about it. But as it is hidden away in many foods, we simply do not realise how much we are eating.

Sugar and gut health

But is sugar particularly bad when it comes to the gut? It sure is! The microorganisms that live in our gut, that is yeasts, bacteria, protozoa, act in a similar way to a metabolic ‘organ’. Sugar changes the gut microbiota in a way that increases intestinal permeability. It can particularly feed Candida (a type of yeast), and ‘bad’ bacteria that cause inflammation, damage the endothelial lining, causing leaky gut. This allows larger molecules to come into contact with immune cells, which react with further inflammation. These molecules then pass into the blood, and are transported to the liver via the portal vein.

And so the microbiome and intestinal permeability have been reported to be involved in the development of chronic liver disease and portal hypertension (high blood pressure). Intestinal permeability has also been associated with visceral fat (fat around the tummy), presumably as the body uses the fat cells to store the toxic macro-molecules that have entered into the bloodstream. So it seems, leaky gut can make you fat, and that’s not just from all the calories in all that sugar!

Because there is so much sugar in the typical diet, our blood sugar levels are soaring, and high blood sugar has also been shown to increase intestinal permeability directly, at least in mice. These sugar spikes trigger the centers in our brain associated with reward, pleasure, and seeking out the source of that feeling. Amazingly, these are the same areas of the brain that light up in people that are addicted to cocaine, heroin, and nicotine.

It’s not your fault that you crave sugar!

It’s clear that sugar has addictive properties and we need to put in the effort to de-normalize sugar, so it loses its group on us. We can then choose to eat it in small amounts, as a treat, and under our control 🙂. We may find that our energy is more even, our gut is healing, and we have lowered our type 2 diabetes risk.

Retrain your taste buds

You can retrain your taste buds, by eliminating all added sugar from your diet for four weeks

At the end of four weeks without added sugar, your taste buds will have adjusted, and you may find sweetened foods just too sweet for your new tastes. The tea you drank with two teaspoons of sugar, may now taste weird and kind of disgusting. Congratulations!You have now successfully de-normalized sugar!

Added sugar is any form of sugar or sugar alternative added to, or contained in, your food. This includes the raw sugar in your tea, coconut sugar, rice bran syrup, maple syrup, molasses, or agave syrup on your fruit. While there are some metabolic differences between the forms of sugar, your gut and its microbiome don’t discriminate between the type or source of the sugar, or whether it is refined or unrefined. It is all the same:

Sugar = Sugar = Sugar

At the end of four weeks without added sugar, you can introduce a little maple syrup or raw local honey if you want to…

Artificial sweeteners aren’t recommended either as they wreak havoc on the gut by altering the gut microbiota. Small amounts of stevia are probably the best option, although even that may cause gut irritation in some sensitive people.

Removing sugar from our diets for four weeks is part of my Leaky Gut Reset Diet program, starting April 23rd. If you would like some extra support, check it out.

croissants

Gluten and Leaky Gut

Catchy headlines poke fun at the gluten-free ‘fad’, and many GPs still do not believe non-celiac gluten sensitivity could be contributing to their patients’ conditions. But what is gluten exactly and what does the research and clinical experience from nutritionists and Functional Medicine practitioners tell us?

Gluten is a family of proteins found in most cereals including wheat, rye, spelt, and barley. The two major proteins that makeup wheat protein are gliadin and glutenin. The gluten proteins when mixed with water, form cross-links which give it a glue-like consistency.

Celiac Disease

In people with celiac disease, gliadin is a powerful trigger of zonulin release. Zonulin increases intestinal permeability by opening the tight junctions in the epithelial lining, and in people with celiac disease, an auto-immune response follows.  This is a serious condition, and full-blown celiac disease is associated with complete atrophy of the villi which line the small intestine and absorb your nutrients. If you suspect celiac disease, particularly if you have a family history of celiac disease, please speak to your GP about testing.

Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

Whilst increased intestinal permeability in response to dietary gluten is most severe in those with celiac disease, zonulin, a marker for intestinal permeability, is also increased in people with what is called non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) and also irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea.

NCGS is a term applied to people who experience symptoms in response to consumed to gluten consumption but do not have celiac disease. They may feel gastro-intestinal discomfort, fatigue or neurological symptoms. These people tend to improve on a gluten-free diet. Unfortunately, these people can be mocked for avoiding wheat and told that it’s all in their head.

But researchers have found that people with NCGS have increased intestinal permeability compared to healthy subjects. This should not be surprising as we know gliadin increases the release of zonulin, which can affect tight junctions. The opening of these tight junctions, our gateways. allows macromolecules to come into contact with our immune system and our bloodstream and explains why the group with NCGS also had a systemic immune activation on eating gluten.

Gluten increases Intestinal Permeability in All Human Tissue

In a 2015 study, researchers found tissue taken from the duodenum of humans became permeable, and there was increased inflammation when exposed to gliadin (i.e. leaky gut). As this study is in tissue taken from people rather than directly in people themselves, we have to be careful extrapolating the results. However, this backs up the experiences of many people .. they feel better when they don’t consume gluten.

In people with gluten sensitivity and NCGS, the damage did not clear after 36 hours, and what is most surprising, is that after five hours the tissue taken from ‘healthy’ people without celiac of NCGS, still had increased permeability.

Now, the epithelial lining of the small intestine is made up of the fastest growing cells in the body, creating a new lining every 3 to 7 days, and the gut lining would heal itself after exposure to gluten. But, if you have toast for breakfast, a sandwich for lunch, and pasta for dinner, it is never getting a chance to heal. Remember, I’m talking about people who aren’t celiac or don’t have NCGS here. If you consume gluten for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, your gut lining never has a chance to repair and you leaky gut will develop.

Researchers refer to this as the loss of oral tolerance. Now, your body can not deal with the toxins you are exposed to, and it may also start reacting to foods you didn’t react to both, as your immune system fights to defend itself. You have pathogenic intestinal permeability or a leaky gut and this can lead to inflammation in the body and autoimmunity.

Although lab tests do exist to look at your sensitivity to gluten, it’s widely accepted that an elimination diet is the best way to test for gluten intolerance. If you have a chronic health condition, it may be a good idea to remove gluten from your diet and see if that is of benefit.