love your gut - heart

How good is your first line of defense?

I’m talking about the importance of stomach acid! This article will let you know why you should care and I’ll also give you an easy test you can do at home to give you an idea of your stomach acid levels, so read on…

Stomach acid, otherwise known as hydrochloric acid (HCl), plays a pivotal role in the breakdown of food, a healthy balance of bacteria in our gut, and the prevention of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and so the prevention and treatment of IBS. As it’s becoming widely accepted that a healthy body depends on a healthy gut, this is important stuff for your health.

Many people with reflux also actually have low stomach acid, rather than too much. You can read more about that here.

When we eat food, digestion begins in the mouth through the process of mastication (chewing to you and me) and the release of enzymes, such as salivary amylase which starts the digestion of carbohydrates. Chewing our food sets the digestive process off to a good start!

Food is further broken down in the stomach by HCl (PH 1.0 to 2.5) and more enzymes. This kills harmful microorganisms and helps create favourable conditions for enzymes such as pepsin which helps to break down protein.

Stomach acid

HCl also makes nutrients such as Vitamin B12, Calcium, Zinc, Iron, and Magnesium available from our food..

If the stomach is too alkaline, the system of the digestive tract does not work well and you end up with up complications further along the tract such as SIBO.

Also, it is often a lack of acid in the stomach, not an excess, that causes reflux as food is not being properly digested and is causing acid to flare up into the esophagus.

But the amount of acid produced is also affected by the amount and type of food you are eating, and also how you are feeling!

Pause for a second, and let that sink in …

If you are stressed and eating on the go, your body is likely to be producing less HCl and your digestion just isn’t going to be great, whatever you are eating. A good tip is to take three, deep mindful breaths whenever you sit down to eat, and to eat away from electronic devices or your office desk.

How to Test for Stomach Acid Levels at Home for Free
Now, I’ll show you the simple test you can do from your home with just bicarbonate of soda and water, to give you an indicator of your HCl levels (remember this is just a guide!).If you are taking NSAIDs, Corticosteroids, or have other concerns, please speak to your GP first.

  1. First thing in the morning drink (in one go) a mixture of 1/4 tsp of bicarbonate of soda mixed in 150ml of room temperature water
  2. Set a timer and measure how long before you belch
  3. Repeat for several mornings to check the results

Ignoring tiny little burps, the test tends to show the earlier you burp, the more stomach acid you have

  • 0-2 Minutes: You have plenty (& possibly, though rarely, too much) HCl
  • 2-3 Minutes: You have about the right amount of HCl
  • 4 Minutes upwards: This may suggest you have low HCl

What Next?
If you suspect you have low HCl, you can encourage its production by mixing a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar, or some lemon in about 200mls of water before you eat.

Eating bitter food or drink may also help digestive secretions and prompt HCl production. Bitters include a bitter tonic such as the traditional Swedish bitters, and foods such as rocket, chicory, dandelion (including tea), radicchio, endive, and artichoke.  HCl + pepsin is also available as a supplement if required.  

And if you unlucky enough to already have an ongoing gut issue such as digestive discomfort, IBS, IBD, bloating, leaky gut, or just want to improve your gut health, drop me a message and I’ll see what I can do to help…


Stephen Ward (MSc) is trained in assessing the root cause of your health issues and together, we can work this out. 

Call 0491611043 or BOOK ONLINE.

Alternatively, send me a message and I’ll get back to you ..

High FODMAP Foods

How to use the Low FODMAP diet to heal your gut

The Low FODMAP diet is now commonly recommended to ease a range of digestive symptoms associated with small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It works by removing foods that commonly cause digestive discomfort from the diet, allowing the gut to heal. Foods are then re-introduced systematically so that trigger foods can be identified. It may be used as part of a gut healing protocol.

FODMAP is an acronym for:

  • Fermentable
  • Oligosaccharides
  • Disaccharides
  • Monosaccharides
  • Polyols

Eek! So what is that in plain English? These are types of sugar that are poorly absorbed by the small intestine and are fermented by bacteria to produce gas. They can cause IBS type symptoms such as gas, bloating, constipation and diarrhea in some people.


Can a low FODMAP diet help you?

Recent research found up to 86 percent of people with IBS saw improvements in their symptoms while on a low FODMAP diet. It has also been found to decrease inflammation, as measured by histamine in the gut, which may reduce neurological symptoms such as brain fog which may be associated with IBS.

A Low FODMAP diet can help you to isolate the types of foods that are causing your symptoms. Once your GP has examined you for other conditions, such as coeliac disease, this diet can help you get back to basics – I commonly recommend this diet as a first step when working with gut issues. It has not only been shown to help many people with IBS, but may also be helpful for other gut conditions such as coeliac disease, Crohn’s and Colitis. It is recommended that you consult with a health care consultant, dietician or Nutritional Therapist, such as myself, before embarking on a low-FODMAP diet.

FODMAPs can feed bacteria in the small intestine, which should only contain a small number of bacteria compared to the colon. This can lead to Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO). Whereas in someone with a healthy gut, these sugars will pass through the small intestine until they get to the colon where they will act as a food source for beneficial bacteria that live there.

What is the low FODMAP diet?

The low-FODMAP diet helps you identify the foods that are causing your symptoms – this varies from person to person. You start by removing foods that are high in FODMAPs for 2-4 weeks or until symptoms ease.

There are many foods that are restricted but you have to remember why you are doing this – The long-term benefits far outweigh the difficulty of eliminating these foods for this period. Remember, everyone reacts to these foods differently so the Low-FODMAP diet allows you to find out which foods are problematic for you.

As a qualified Nutritional Therapist, I can guide you through this process, help you with tasty and tolerable alternatives to high FODMAP foods, and guide you through the re-introduction phase and help you to identify other causes of your gut issues

The main sources of FODMPs include (there are other high FODMAP foods not on this list):

Oligosaccharides: Wheat products, vegetables such as onions and garlic, all beans and pulses including chickpeas, lentils and soybean, and inulins added to foods such as certain yoghurts, protein bars, and milks.

Disaccharides: The main one is Lactose and many people are Lactose intolerant. Lactose is not the same as dairy: Cream, hard cheeses and butter contain a limited amount of lactose. Most people with malabsorption can handle 4g of Lactose before they encounter issues, and so a thin spread of butter or a dash of milk may be OK, but a Latte may not.

Monosaccharides: These are simple sugars with excess fructose being the main one. Examples of foods containing an excess of fructose include fruit juices, apples, cherries, watermelon, peaches, plums, nectarines, mango

Polyols: Mushrooms, fruits such as apricots, chewing gum, and added sugar alcohols 

How does the low-FODMAP diet work?

Phase 1 – FODMAP Restriction

Phase 1 is a strict restriction of all high FODMAP foods for two to four weeks, or until symptoms settle. The low-FODMAP diet originated out of research by Monash University and they have developed an app which can be used to know the FODMAP content of various foods. It has proven invaluable to many people.

Keeping track of how particular foods affect you is also recommended. That way, you can more clearly see patterns between what you eat and how you feel.

Phase 2 – FODMAP Reintroduction

During this phase, you methodically re-introduce foods that were restricted in Phase 1. Foods are re-introduced one-by-one and in a specific order. The idea is that at the end of this process you will have a better understanding of which foods trigger your symptoms, and you can continue to eat the ones, you do not react to. This process will take several weeks or months, and I suggest you work through this process with a Nutritionist, such as myself, or a dietitian.

Is this the perfect diet?

The Low-FODMAP diet can be a life saver for many people and can transform some people’s quality of life and well being within days…

But like anything, there is a downside. When you do a restrictive diet like this, you run the risk of cutting out many nutrient-rich foods and good sources of fibre –  fibre is fuel for the beneficial bacteria in our colon, and is an important part of a healthy diet.

For this reason, and contrary to the belief of many people, eliminating all high FODMAP foods is not a healthful solution. Identifying the particular FODMAPs that trigger your symptoms allows you to include as many healthy high FODMAP foods in your diet as possible. 

What next?

You can, of course, do the low-FODMAP diet and re-introduction on your own, but many people prefer to work with a Nutritionist such as myself to help them identify what they can eat (that’s tasty too!), what they are reacting to, and to guide them through the re-introduction phase. We even have a coaching app for your phone so that I can support you through this process.  

Also, as the diet doesn’t necessarily help you find the root cause of your IBS, a practitioner can help you with testing for a bacterial or fungal overgrowth that may be causing your issues and work with you on other causes of your health issues.

If you’d like to talk me to about the low-FODMAP diet, or your options for working with IBS or other health conditions, please contact me with any questions or give me a call.

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